Archives for posts with tag: olivia hantken

We’ll be back to regular programming tomorrow, but until then please enjoy the final guest post by Liv for the moment (she will be back!).

House & Garden – June 1971 by Olivia Hantken

Carrying on from my last post, here is another House & Garden magazine which I adore. This issue was hard to pull apart, so I have chosen a bit of everything! From garden sitting rooms, to outdoor entertaining, and two amazing forest retreats.

House & GardenHouse & GardenHouse & GardenHouse & Garden

Located in Waccabuc NY, and designed by architect Myron Goldfinger this amazing house still exists today and is actually for sale! Check out the listing here. Sadly it looks as if the house has been redesigned and lost some of its 1970s charm.

House & GardenHouse & GardenHouse & GardenThis bird watching structure is located on a riverbank in England, and was designed by two British husband and wife architectural teams: Richard & Su Rogers, and Norman & Wendy Foster.

House & GardenHouse & GardenThank you so much to Liv for her beautiful contributions and enthusiasm for The Secret Garden.

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House & Garden – June 1970 by Olivia Hantken

I picked up this treasure whilst shopping with my mum in Brunswick many years ago. There was a big stack and I regret that we only bought two! They float between her bookcase and mine as we not only love the beautiful images, but enjoy the time warp we enter when reading them.

Whilst not strictly gardens, below is a series of images from this issue featuring alfresco living ideas and interior design.

House & GardenMy favourite is without a doubt the bean bag room. This was taken from the penthouse of french actor Francois Perrier (on Boulevard St Germain of course!). He was aided by interior decorator Francois Arnal, who also painted the black and white composition on the far wall.

Along with the Zanuda bean bag chairs, the feature cactus and amazing ash trays make me conjure images of some of the amazing parties Francois must have thrown.

House & GardenHouse & GardenHouse & GardenHouse & GardenHouse & GardenHouse & GardenHouse & GardenHouse & GardenHouse & GardenAll images from House & Garden – June 1970. British, American, French No. 6 Whole No. 250 Volume 25 The Conde Nast Publication.

After a successful first guest post the other week, Olivia Hantken will be back taking care of the blog this week while I on holiday in Japan.

I will be posting plenty of shots on Instagram, so be sure to follow me @thesecretgardenblog

Hanging Gardens by Olivia Hantken

Vintage gardening magazines seem to be taking over more and more of my bookshelf, so I will be sharing selected images from some of my favourites over the next few weeks.

The first is a little gem I found called Sunset Ideas for Hanging Gardens. It was published in 1974 and features instructions and trends for a variety of suspended gardens. Some of my favourites are the giant boston fern (being watered from a ladder), the donkey tail sedum, the string of beads and the bonsai cedar with moss.

Hanging GardenHanging GardenHanging GardensHanging GardenHanging GardenHanging GardenHanging GardenHanging GardenAll images from Sunset Ideas for Hanging Gardens, Lane Publishing co. California 1974.

Friends are constantly sending me bits and pieces about gardens and flowers, so I figured it was time to give some a chance to guest post on the blog. So that brings us to our first ever guest post by the lovely Olivia Hantken. Liv works at innovative design and film collective Collider, and has a key eye for aesthetics. Please welcome her to The Secret Garden!

Frozen Flowers by Olivia Hantken

Frozen FlowersTomorrow is the first day of winter, but in Sydney it’s feeling more like spring. Our gardens will be happy at least, and far happier than in Kiev, Ukraine, where winter can mean a freezing over of everything green.

Earlier this year the Ukranian’s embraced this notion and held their first frozen flower exhibition The Flowers of the Snow Queen.  Inspired by Hans Christan Andersen’s children’s tale The Snow Queen, the event symbolises the coming together of summer and winter / warmth and cold.

Frozen FlowersThe frozen artworks were created over seven days using 250 litres of distilled water repeatedly poured over the arrangements to create layers of ice.

Frozen FlowersNot related to this exhibition, but beautiful nonetheless are these pictures of flowers dripping in ice.

Frozen FlowersFrozen FlowersFrozen FlowersFrozen FlowersFrozen Flowers
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